Clinic Projects

Please click on a link below to view the Harvey Mudd College Computer Science Clinic projects for the corresponding time period.

Clinic Projects for 1996-1997

Automated Entry of Engineering Data (joint with Engineering Clinic)

Client
Accel Technologies, Inc.

Faculty Advisor
Professors Robert Keller and Erik Spjut (Engineering)

Student Team
Michael Balloni, Hieu Bui (Team Leader), Eric Gibbs, and Terry Ibert
The goals for this project were to develop and prototype a means of converting raw bit-mapped data from electronic component specification sheets, for entry into a printed-circuit board CAD (computer-aided design) tool. This entailed optical character recognition and optical graphic recognition. The team created a Windows-based software package which will accept information from a scanned bitmap, from Adobe PDF (portable data format) files, or from other sources, and which, with minimal user-interaction, produces ASCII data in a form usable by Accel's tools.

Security of Asynchronous Transfer Mode Networks

Client
GTE

Faculty Advisor
Professor Mike Erlinger

Student Team
Kelsey Anderson, Matthew Dharm, Steve Foley, and John Larkin
This project team developed security features for ILMP (Integrated Local Management Protocol), which does basic ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) administration.

Automatic Parallelism Analysis for RISC Architectures

Client
IBM Austin Research Laboratory

Faculty Advisor
Professor Ran Libeskind-Hadas

Student Team
Joe Bester, Brian Carnes (Team Leader), and Mark Reyes
This project involved research and development methods in formal verification of correctness in asynchronous processor design. The team built software tools for the verification of equivalence between high-level behavioral descriptions and low-level structural ones, using formal transformations. As an example, the team created an asynchronous model of the MIPS R2000 processor, reduced it to a low-level specification. The team also created its own portable VHDL simulator, a deadlock verification tool, and a component visualization tool.

Database Administrative Interface Modules

Client
Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Faculty Advisor
Professor Robert Keller

Student Team
Beth Coleman (Team Leader), Chris Sloan, and Kevin Sours
This project entailed development of a graphical database administrator tool which provides linkage between a high-level object-oriented database model and lower-level relational ones. Also developed was an API (application program interface) specification to enable extraction of data from an Oracle relational database for use in JPL's object-oriented model.

PDA-based Entertainment Directory

Client
Microsoft Corporation

Faculty Advisor
Professor Wing Tam and Professor Josh Hodas

Student Team
David Hamm (Team Leader), Josh Jones, Phil Sphicas, and Charles Wurster
The Clinic team developed software for moving event information from a web-based entertainment guide (Sidewalk) to hand-held computing devices which have no direct access to the Internet. The project entailed a parser and browser-like interface for presenting the data in a readable form as well as data-transmission software. Both the U.S. Robotics Pilot and Windows CE platforms were supported.

Universal Voice Transcoder

Client
Octel Communications Corporation

Faculty Advisor
Professor Wing Tam

Student Team
Dallas Bethune, David Gorgone, Travis Greer, and Kevin Rae
The team developed an API (application program interface) application for converting from one sound format to another, in real-time when possible. The application runs on the Windows NT platform.

Network-Enabled Vis5D

Client
The Aerospace Corporation

Faculty Advisor
Professor Mike Erlinger

Student Team
Scott Boone, Rob Clark, Blaine Howell, and Dylan Loomis (Team Leader)
The team developed a client-server library which enables Vis5d, a scientific visualization tool, to visualize data being streamed across an ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) network. Previously the tool could only view data from a local file.