Clinic Projects

Please click on a link below to view the Harvey Mudd College Computer Science Clinic projects for the corresponding time period.

Clinic Projects for 2001-2002

Performance Independent Melody Recognition

Client
Auditude

Faculty Advisor
Professor Robert Keller

Student Team
Jason Yelinek (Team Leader), Matt Brubeck, Joshdan Griffin, Eric Huang
The team developed software that identifies songs based on monophonic audio performances of the song, and reported on research toward the more difficult problem of recognizing songs from polyphonic performances. This software is intended to complement Auditude's existing technology that recognizes commercially recorded performances in real time.

Design and Prototype of Low-Cost Weather Information System for General Aviation

Client
Boeing Air Traffic Management

Faculty Advisor
Professor Geoff Kuenning

Student Team
Cora Hussey (Team Leader), Christopher Lee, Jonathan Morley, Morgan Wagner, Neilsen Yu
Foul weather contributes to aviation accidents and delays. To enhance aviation safety, The Boeing Company wishes to develop a low cost method to display real-time weather data in the cockpit of general aviation aircraft. The Clinic team designed and developed a system that gathers weather data, obtains GPS coordinates, and graphically displays that data on the screen of a Compaq iPaq PDA, in a form that is familiar to and usable by pilots.

A Distributed Medical Monitoring System for Real-Time Patient Diagnosis (joint with Engineering Clinic)

Client
Center For Integration Of Medicine And Innovative Technology (CIMIT)

Faculty Advisor
Professor Ruye Wang (Engineering)

Student Team
Grant Baxter (Team Leader), Adam Fischer, Daniel Lee, Steven Yan
Current patient monitoring procedures in hospital intensive care units generate large volumes of raw patient data. Doctors lack resources to properly process this data and a significant portion goes unused. Tools capable of detecting long-term trends and correlations within this data will allow doctors to more accurately diagnose patients. The Clinic team designed and implemented a distributed hardware/software architecture for developing condition-specific software models which provide high-level analysis of raw patient data.

Algorithms and Data Structures for Time-Dependent Networks

Client
Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc.

Faculty Advisor
Professor Ran Libeskind-Hadas

Student Team
Kylie Evans '03 (Team Leader), Nathaniel Dirksen, Melissa Chase '03, Jacob Creed
ESRI provides tools for capturing, storing and analyzing networks of virtually any type, from highways to electrical wiring. This project augments ESRI's system with the ability to represent networks where the cost of traversing an edge changes with time, and to solve shortest-path queries on these new time-dependent networks. This will allow ESRI's customers to model bus schedules, rush-hour traffic, and similar phenomena, allowing greater accuracy in determining shortest paths.

Biometrically Enabling Web Applications

Client
I/O Software, Inc.

Faculty Advisor
Professor Josh Hodas

Student Team
Jocelyn Chew (Team Leader), Michael Cramblett, Donald Lawton, Daniel Phiffer
I/O Software is a leading developer of security software using biometrics to restrict access to data and applications on computers. They have asked the team to extend their software's capabilities to securing access to web pages. This product, in the form of server-side and client-side plug-ins, performs a biometrically-enabled user verification sequence between the local user's browser and a remote database to control access to online assets.

Multilevel Parallelization of the Smith-Waterman Algorithm

Client
Marine Biological Laboratory

Faculty Advisor
Professor Elizabeth Sweedyk

Student Team
Ben Zeckel (TL Spring), Kurt Dresner (TL Fall), Drew Levin, Andrew Magis, Eric Ong
A common task in molecular biology is the search for similarity between a given strand of DNA or protein and the sequences in a database such as GenBank. The most accurate search programs aimed at this problem are based on the Smith-Waterman algorithm. Typical open-source implementations are slow while fast commercial implementations are quite expensive. The team implemented a parallelized version intended to be freely distributed while being performance competitive with commercial packages.

Proton Beam Treatment System Vacuum Monitoring and Control System

Client
Optivus Technology, Inc.

Faculty Advisor
Professor Geoffrey Kuenning

Student Team
Patrick Vinograd (Team Leader), Saba Ahmad, Geoffrey Romer '03, Aaron Clark
The team developed a distributed software system that allows centralized monitoring and automated control of a large number of vacuum devices. It will be used in proton beam-based cancer treatment facilities where an extensive vacuum system is needed to treat patients. Optivus, providing technical oversight and support for Loma Linda University Medical Center's Proton Beam Therapy Center, will use the system with the goal of preventing vacuum loss and thus improving patient treatment.

Software Development Tools for ARM-Based Wireless Devices

Client
QUALCOMM Incorporated

Faculty Advisor
Professor Christopher Stone

Student Team
Roy Shea (Team Leader), Samuel Ahn, Andrew Schoonmaker, Erin Sperry
QUALCOMM, Inc. has developed BREW, a software API for ARM-based handheld devices. BREW enables developers to write applications that can be run on a variety of such devices, including wireless phones. The team was asked to reduce the cost of developing BREW applications by finding a way to use GNU GCC within the Windows NT/2000 environment to compile BREW applications for the ARM target, eliminating the need for the expensive ARM compiler suite.

Automatic Generation of Distributed Service Adapters

Client
Teradyne, Inc.

Faculty Advisor
Professor Zachary Dodds

Student Team
Michael Allen (Team Leader), Aaron Boyer, Edward Miller, Jason Wither
The team developed a software tool that, given a Java interface, generates adapters that allow programmers to use Java components in a distributed computing environment in a transparent fashion. The adapters are themselves software components that perform translation between two software interfaces. Additionally, the team investigated the challenges inherent in maintaining the usual semantics of a non-distributed programming system while providing distributed capabilities.

VisiFault

Client
Teradyne, Inc.

Faculty Advisor
Professor Robert Keller

Student Team
Hang Tang '03 (Team Leader), Michael Szal, Don Wang, Stephen Friedman '03
Teradyne makes automatic test equipment (ATE) for semiconductor devices. As devices grow more complex, test vectors becomes much larger, and the time required to analyze the failures grows too long. The team developed a system, VisiFault, which graphically displays scan failure results from the ATE and physical fault results from a diagnosis program so one can quickly pinpoint causes of failures. VisiFault also provides functions such as aggregation and comparison to help in analyzing the data.

Implementing an IDMEF Message Management Tool

Client
The Aerospace Corporation

Faculty Advisor
Professor Mike Erlinger

Student Team
Eric Heitzman (Team Leader), Richard McKnight, Eider Moore, Rayford Sims
The Aerospace Corporation has sponsored a series of projects focusing on issues in intrusion detection in computer networks. The Intrusion Detection Working Group of the Internet Engineering Task Force (a standards body) is developing a common XML message format for communicating intrusion detection events, called the Intrusion Detection Message Exchange Format (IDMEF). The team designed and implemented a web-accessible database-driven application to display, manage, and facilitate the manual correlation of IDMEF messages.

Reimplementation of Scientific Applications in a Massively Distributed Framework

Client
United Devices

Faculty Advisor
Professor Melissa O'Neill

Student Team
Steve DiVerdi (Team Leader), Elmer Kim '03, Aaron Namba, Megan Thorsen
United Devices (UD) provides distributed computing solutions to clients with a wide range of projects, with a focus on aiding bioinformatics research. UD has created the UD MetaProcessor platform, a robust, scalable, and extensible client and server solution for massively distributed computing. The Clinic team was tasked with porting two existing single-machine bioinformatics applications to the MetaProcessor Platform.