Clinic Projects

Please click on a link below to view the Harvey Mudd College Computer Science Clinic projects for the corresponding time period.

Clinic Projects for 2002-2003

Music Similarity and Recommendation

Client
Auditude

Faculty Advisor
Professor Melissa O'Neill

Student Team
Paul Ruvolo (Project Manager), Brad Poon, Elizabeth Schoof, Nicholas Taylor
The team investigated content-based similarity relationships between musical performances. Similarity is a complex concept involving many judgments. The team focused their attention on a combination of rhythm, timbre, and apparent loudness. The team developed software that extracts these features from a recording and uses them to categorize new music, to make recommendations, and to generate playlists that arrange music in a sequence with smooth transitions between songs.

Design and Prototype of a Low-Cost Weather Information System for General Aviation

Client
Boeing Air Traffic Management

Faculty Advisor
Professor Geoff Kuenning

Student Team
Paul Paradise (Project Manager), Luke Hunter, Kyle Kuypers, Rafael Vasquez
The team designed and implemented a proof-of-concept design for delivering weather data to aircraft pilots in-flight. Using a Pocket PC PDA as a hardware architecture and a custom client and server, they were able to deliver METAR (Meteorological Reports) and NEXRAD (NEXt-generation RADar) to pilots. The current implementation uses 802.11b wireless technology for the communication, but is ideally suited for satellite-based broadcast as a final product.

Development of a Community-Supported Media-Contact Database

Client
Green Media Toolshed

Faculty Advisor
Professors Geoff Kuenning and Josh Hodas

Student Team
Christine Spritke (Project Manager), Marissa Anderson, Ben Frantzdale, John Suarez
In order to effectively deal with a high reporter turnover rate, the Green Media Toolshed team's goal was to develop a community-supported media-contact database that is economically viable for non-profit organizations by minimizing the need for a large research staff. The team implemented and assessed the effectiveness of user and data quality metrics, as well as automated checking tools, to coordinate the efforts of a network of volunteer data checkers.

Design of an Automated Email Response System

Client
Kofax Image Products, Inc.

Faculty Advisor
Professor Robert Keller

Student Team
John Sander (Project Manager), Ryan Crabb, Jeffrey Jirsa, Joe Malone
The goal of the Kofax Clinic Project was to design and construct a system that can learn by example to provide candidate responses to customer service questions. The system learns to respond to incoming E-mail by first observing human responses. Then as new questions are asked to the customer service staff the system will suggest possible answers by drawing on responses to similar questions that the system has previously seen.

Automatic Form Recognition, Alignment, and Extraction

Client
Laserfiche

Faculty Advisor
Professor Zachary Dodds

Student Team
Brandt Erickson (Project Manager), Josh Kline, Jessica Lee, Jonathan Shriver, Robert Strickland
The LaserFiche project involved creating a software tool that automatically matches the image of a filled-in paper form to a corresponding blank template from a database. This tool permits a document-processing system to handle a large set of mixed forms without requiring a human to identify each one. Once an input form is identified, an anchoring step aligns and extracts the user's input in order to improve the performance of additional form processing.

Animated Public Service Announcement

Client
Magulandia Studio

Faculty Advisor
Professor Elizabeth Sweedyk

Student Team
Alisa Decker (Project Manager), Mira Stoilova, Rosie Wacha, Joanna Wu
The purpose of the Magulandia Studio Clinic project was to create a 30-second public service announcement addressing road rage. The team used Maya (a 3D computer graphics animation tool used in movies such as Shrek) to build the necessary models and animate a short sequence for the PSA. The animation style utilizes exaggerated characters and scenery. The sequence uses personifications of cars and animals to make a comic point about the need to control one's temper on the road.

Software Hardening in Space-Based Systems

Client
Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems, Space Systems Division

Faculty Advisor
Professor Christopher Stone

Student Team
Andrew Klose (Project Manager), Eric Angell, James Simmons, Marty Weiner
Current space-based digital electronics lag their commercial counterparts by several generations. The physical hardening process required to protect these components from exoatmospheric radiation events is both costly and time-consuming. This project examined the feasibility of implementing a software-based alternative to this process. Specifically, the team examined the question of whether the increased processing power and memory capacity of commercially available components provide sufficient resources for software-implemented detection of radiation effects.

Implementation of and Experimentation with a Clustering Tool

Client
Sandia National Laboratories

Faculty Advisor
Professor Belinda Thom

Student Team
Avani Gadani (Project Manager), Daniel Lowd, Brian Roney, Eric Wu
The team created a tool for simultaneously visualizing several different reductions of multi-dimensional data sets. It also analyzed these sets using geometric techniques and clustering. To assess clustering fitness, the team implemented validity metrics that quantitatively compare solutions and algorithms in various ways. The tool was used to analyze data sets ranging from journal citations to popular music.

Extensible Data Management for Semiconductor Design-for-Testability

Client
Teradyne, Inc.

Faculty Advisor
Professor Ran Libeskind-Hadas

Student Team
Kristal Pollack (Project Manager), Mike Bailey, Annie Chang, Peter Tempest
Teradyne's DFT (Design for Testability) Software Group is developing a software system that enables semiconductor manufacturers to exploit DFTtechnologies in order to reduce test costs, accelerate time to market, and enhance yield. However, to make the best use of DFT, semiconductor manufacturers must also be able to easily manage and interpret the automatically generated test results along with existing semiconductor design information and new information produced by DFT diagnosis tools. This Clinic team created a Java and XML/XSLT based system to meet this need.

Test Data Management System

Client
Teradyne, Inc.

Faculty Advisor
Professor Robert Keller

Student Team
Micah Garside-White (Project Manager), Conor Sen, Ryan Gibson, Adrian Mettler
The team designed and prototyped a system with web-based interfaces for managing data from high-performance automated semiconductor test equipment based on distributed persistent data storage. The system enables users of a test service to query and process results from a wide range of geographic sites using interfaces that decouple test equipment specifics. The system is entirely based on the emergent Java Two Enterprise Edition (J2EE) framework and includes capabilities for fault tolerance and recovery.

Implementing the Interoperable IETF/IDWG/IDXP Protocol With Proxy/Tunnel Capability

Client
The Aerospace Corporation

Faculty Advisor
Professor Mike Erlinger

Student Team
Nicolas Hertl (Project Manager), William Berriel, Chip Bradford, Richard Fujiyama
In the world of Intrusion Detection there is a need for a common message format and transport protocol so that different organizations can collaborate. This allows for the easy correlation, display, and long term storage of intrusion information. This year's project builds on the work of previous intrusion detection projects sponsored by The Aeorspace Corporation. It provides for messages to securely pass through firewalls using a newly specified BEEP (Blocks Extensible Exchange Protocol) profile called Tunnel.