Clinic Projects

Please click on a link below to view the Harvey Mudd College Computer Science Clinic projects for the corresponding time period.

Clinic Projects for 2006-2007

Soft Co-Occurrence Clustering for Natural Language Understanding

Client
Fair Isaac Corporation

Faculty Advisor
Professor Christine Alvarado

Student Team
Stephen Jones (Project Manager), Christopher Kain, George Tucker, Craig Weidert
Co-clustering is a statistical technique that groups objects that share similar features. It has applications in many fields, including natural language processing. Current co-clustering algorithms limit each item to one cluster, but in many cases items fall naturally into more than one cluster (e.g, the word "may" in natural language processing). The team used a Dirichlet mixture model to implement "soft" co-clustering, assigning each item a probability of being in each cluster.

Improved Photo-Document Segmentation

Client
Laserfiche

Faculty Advisor
Professor Zachary Dodds

Student Team
Adam Field, Stephen Smith, Benjamin Tribelhorn (Project Manager), Aaron Wolin
This project seeks to replace a document scanner with a hand-held digital camera as a front-end to Laserfiche's document-management solutions. Conditions such as shadows, indistinct backgrounds, multiple documents, and occlusions make it difficult to determine the document's location within the camera's image: this is the segmentation problem. The team has integrated pixel-level, edge-level, and structural-level image processing routines within a probabilistic framework to find appropriate document segmentation in a variety of business cases.

Animated Physics Simulation of the LANSCE 800 MeV Proton Accelerator

Client
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Faculty Advisor
Professor Ran Libeskind-Hadas

Student Team
Faith Dang, Joe Ishikura (Project Manager, fall), Pyry Matikainen, Michael Tauraso (Project Manager, spring), Steve Wyckoff
The Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, New Mexico provides exhibits of both the history of and the current science and technology efforts at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a signature facility that attracts scientists from around the world to conduct experiments, yet the LANSCE Museum exhibit is outdated and does not represent its extant scientific capabilities. The Clinic team developed a state-of-the-art fly-through interactive of the LANSCE facilities that has become a principle educational and demonstrative media piece for the Bradbury Science Museum exhibit with alternate versions available via the LANSCE website, embedded in presentations and available in DVD products.

Exploiting 3-D Geobrowser Technology to Provide Situational Awareness During Incidents

Client
NC4

Faculty Advisor
Professor Melissia O'Neill

Student Team
Russ Rutledge (Project Manager), Martin Hunt, Josh Utter-Leyton, Micah Lamdin
Given a summary report about an "incident" (fire, traffic accident, etc.), the clinic team's system automatically finds nearby news outlets likely to publish Internet articles about the incident. The system also searches these outlets to find specific articles covering the incident. Key elements of the project nvolve spatial search and text classification. This system will assist NC4's information analysts to research current incidents quickly, ensuring up-to-date incident information in the hands of NC4's clients.

Extending and Analyzing on Object-Based Filesystem Simulator

Client
Sandia National Laboratories

Faculty Advisor
Professor Geoff Kuenning

Student Team
Jonathan Beall, Kapy Kangombe, Andrew Taylor, Daniel Turner (Project Manager)
Sandia Labs is building a simulator to simulate the cpu, network, and storage components of a supercomputer. The Clinic team is working on the simulation of the storage nodes, adopting last year's storage-node simulator as a starting point. They are updating the file system and DiskSim, a hard disk simulator, to make the simulator more accurate. The team will also perform additional validation of the simulator.

A Grid-Enabled Version of SOAP for the Aerospace Cluster and CDC Communities

Client
The Aerospace Corporation

Faculty Advisor
Professor Robert Keller

Student Team
Thomas Barr, Chris Byron (Project Manager, spring), Ben Lickly, Carl Nygaard (Project Manager, fall), Kyle Roberts
The Clinic team created a platform-independent portal that enables a highly-parallel version of SOAP (Satellite Orbit Analysis Program) to be accessible to a wide community of users for the first time. Heretofore, a user of the parallel version of SOAP would need to be conversant with UNIX commands and other technical aspects of grid computing. Using the team's portal, the power of grid- enabled SOAP is accessible through a simple web interface.

A Grid-Enabled Biometrics Identification Framework for Video Surveillance Applications

Client
The Aerospace Corporation

Faculty Advisor
Professor Ran Libeskind-Hadas

Student Team
Michael Coupland (Project Manager, fall), Stephanie Grush, Mac Mason, Paul Wais (Project Manager, spring), Matt Mock (fall)
This Clinic project addressed face recognition and grid computing with a framework for distributed biometric identification. ANUBIS, the Aerospace networked upgradeable biometric identification system, is a grid-enabled surveillance application that applies face recognition to video streams. ANUBIS utilizes Aerospace's Switchblade library, a Java framework for the distributed processing of streaming data, and the Identix FaceIt toolkit, and is extensible to accommodate alternative biometric data schemes.