Clinic Projects

Please click on a link below to view the Harvey Mudd College Computer Science Clinic projects for the corresponding time period.

Clinic Projects for 2009-2010

ANP Design-A-Light Assembler

Client
ANP Lighting

Faculty Advisor
Professor Melissa O'Neill

Student Team
Greg Bickerman, Megan Campbell (Fall Project Manager), Matthew Wodrich, Alice Zhu (Spring Project Manager)
The team has developed an interactive web-based application for creating designs of custom street lamps built from individual parts. Users can select pieces they desire from large collection of components, and our application intelligently assembles them to display a schematic of the completed lamp. The sponsor builds lamps from these schematics and distributes the products to clients such as the city of Los Angeles, Target, and Walt Disney World.

SPARQLy: An RDF Store For Regularly Structured Data

Client
Dreamworks Animation

Faculty Advisor
Professor Christopher Stone

Student Team
Joshua Durgin, Zvi Effron, Joshua Swanson (Project Manager), Steven Watanabe
DreamWorks Animation represents some of its working information about movies, scenes, etc. into an RDF (Resource Description Framework) store. RDF is more flexible than conventional relational databases, maintain an unstructured and constantly hanging web of relationships between pieces of data. This lack of structure means that searching RDF can be slow. The team has developed an RDF store optimized for subsets of data where the structure is stable and well-defined (for instance, every scene is part of exactly one movie).

Aggregating Web Application User Interaction for Usability Analysis

Client
Genius.com Inc.

Faculty Advisor
Professor Geoff Kuenning

Student Team
Rachel-Mikel ArceJaeger, James Brown, Sayuri Soejima (Project Manager), Dmitriy Yakovlev
The team developed a web-based JavaScript framework that observes and collects user behavior to assess the usability of Genius.com's web application. In particular, the framework detects and records mouse movement, screen scrolling, element selec- tion, page navigation, and other user interactions. This framework will allow Genius.com to evaluate the intuitiveness of its application's user-interface design.

Laserfiche Mobile

Client
Laserfiche

Faculty Advisor
Professor Elizabeth Sweedyk

Student Team
Steven Berler, Bart Broad, Joshua Klontz, Alex Yin (Project Manager)
Laserfiche provides enterprise content management software used in a wide range of industries. The Laserfiche Mobile Clinic team is designing and implementing an iPhone application for convenient remote access to Laserfiche repositories. Design challenges include creating a fluid and compact user interface and optimizing communication for acceptable responsiveness over a 3G connection. The application is capable of searching, browsing, viewing, and updating documents and their metadata. It can also upload images of new documents acquired with the iPhone camera.

Data Inversion For a New Spectral Imaging Technique

Client
Southwest Research Institute (SwRI)

Faculty Advisor
Professor Zachary Dodds, Professor Richard Haskell

Student Team
Arthur Eigenbrot, Zeke Koziol, Will Scott (Project Manager), Martin van Schaardenburg
The SHAZAM system is able to take very high resolution data of the Sun's magnetic field through a new technique called Stereoscopic Spectroscopy. This technique combines a unique instrument setup with new reduction algorithms to allow for full integration over all wavelengths and spatial dimensions. This Clinic project produced a data processing pipeline that performs standard data reduction, cross correlation stereoscopy, and newly developed differential stereoscopy on recorded data in order to produce final magnetograms.

Complex Event Processing of SBIRS Data Streams

Client
The Aerospace Corporation

Faculty Advisor
Professor Robert Keller

Student Team
Joshua Ehrlich (Project Manager), Dan Halloran, Simon Yang, Dav Yust
The Aerospace Corporation proposed a net-centric approach to processing data from the Space-Based Infrared System (SIBRS) of satellites. The team developed four prototype application components that demonstrate the potential of this new approach: an information filter construction system, a heat-map display, a recommendation system, and a search system. These components will aid analysts in processing the high volume of data emitting from SIBRS, making it possible to draw conclusions more readily and decrease reaction time to events of significance.