Clinic Projects

Please click on a link below to view the Harvey Mudd College Computer Science Clinic projects for the corresponding time period.

Clinic Projects for 2011-2012

Automated Characterization of Fission Tracks in Apatite Crystals

Client
Apatite to Zircon, Inc.

Faculty Advisor
Professor Zachary Dodds

Student Team
Calvin Loncaric, Thea Osinski, Colin O’Bryne, Leif Gaebler
Our goal is to develop an application to help geologists find and characterize fission tracks and fission track tips in apatite crystals as efficiently and reliably as possible. This involves computer vision algorithms for automatic identification, the creation of usable human interface, accurate models for the data, and a library for storing and retrieving results.

Physics Simulation Using JavaScript with Data-Parallel Extensions

Client
Intel-Santa Clara

Faculty Advisor
Professor Melissa O’Neill

Student Team
William Bulk, Daniel Lubarov, Paul Hobbs, Phil Aelion-Moss
Like a car using only one cylinder, much of the potential of today's multicar computers goes unused - especially browsing the web. Intel's "River Trail" provides data-parallel extension to JavaScript, offering the potential unprecedented parallel speedup for tasks running in the browser. In this project, we have built a multi-object physics simulation to provide a compelling demonstration that showcases the data-parallel approach, and offer valuable feedback to Intel on the design and implementation of their "River Trail" prototype.

Rethinking Modern Media

Client
Intel–Hillsboro

Faculty Advisor
Professor Melissa O’Neill

Student Team
Chris Beavers, Richard Porczak, Richard Truong, Yoyo Zhang
Despite advances in picture clarity and screen size, the traditional television experience has remained largely unchanged for over 50 years. In this project, we have reimagined how core parts of the TV experience could and should be improved to take advantage of modern technology and lifestyles. In the first, we've broken from the shackles of linear time based seeking and have given users complete freedom to seek intelligently and contextually within the content they are enjoying. In the second project, we've re-imagined the TV "viewing party" experience for the modern age, where participants are rarely in the same physical room together but instead are staying connected virtually through social media and other networks.

Supercomputer Stress Testing

Client
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Faculty Advisor
Professor Christopher Stone

Student Team
Adam Novak, Benson Khau, Camille Marvin, Kimberly Sheely
As supercomputers increase in scale and utilize an increasing variety of hardware, there are more failures and fewer off-the-shelf test suites for finding them. The goal of this project is to design, implement, test, and deliver to Los Alamos National Laboratory a system that includes a test suite that can be used to find failures. The system can also be used to reduce the possible source of a failure from the entire supercomputer to a small set of components.

Stroke Rehabilitation Via Augmented Objects in Microsoft Surface

Client
Microsoft Corporation

Faculty Advisor
Professor Elizabeth Sweedyk

Student Team
Kiley Sobel, Russell Transue, Andy Kearney, Lilian de Greef
The Microsoft Clinic team designed and developed a computer game for the Microsoft Surface, a large multi-touch display, to aid in stroke rehabilitation. The patient controls sea creatures in a virtual aquarium through gestures that are part of their physical therapy. The game is designed to motivate patients to perform their exercises and to provide an assessment of their progress.

Automated Record and Playback Within Microsoft Silverlight Applications

Client
Parasoft Corporation

Faculty Advisor
Professor Ben Wiedermann

Student Team
Eric Aleshire, Alexa Keizur, Bea Metitiri, Stuart Pernsteiner
In this project, we develop library that allows for recording and playback of user interactions with Silverlight web applications. Using this library, it is possible to automate flexible and rigorous testing of Silverlight applications, without requiring prior modification. Additionally, our library is designed to be simple to use and integrate into larger testing frameworks.

Parallelizing and Enriching AtC, a Finite Element Extension for the LAMMPS Molecular Dynamics Code

Client
Sandia National Laboratories

Faculty Advisor
Professor Ran Libeskind-Hadas

Student Team
Sean Laguna, Fiona Tay, Aaron Gable, Tselil Schramm
The Atomistic-to-Continuum (AtC) package extends a classical molecular dynamics code, pairing atomic-scale simulation with the Finite Element Method (FEM) to model the effects of molecular behavior at a larger scale. Currently, the AtC package supports neither parallel computation nor the desired methodological flexibility. We will profile and optimize AtC, then extend its functionality to include parallelization of computation, more complex element geometries including tetrahedral, and support for higher-order shape functions in the FEM.

Improving Security for Android Smartphones

Client
The Aerospace Corporation

Faculty Advisor
Professor Geoff Kuenning

Student Team
Kathryn Lingel, Steve Matsumoto Oliver Ortlieb, Adam Cozzelle
As smartphones become more widespread and powerful, they are becoming a more common target for attacks and malware. To help address these growing security threats, we are building a defense mechanism that strengthens the security of Android-based smartphones by making it more difficult for malicious applications to interfere with the communications of other applications. In particular, we are modifying the Android source code to better handle messages sent between applications and testing our defense on both simulated and real-life applications.

Pose Correction for Automated Facial Recognition

Client
The MITRE Corporation

Faculty Advisor
Professor Zachary Dodds

Student Team
Emma Taborsky, Emily Myers-Stanhope, Elliot Godzich, Dylan Marriner, Heather Williams
MITRE is a not-for-profit corporation, chartered to work solely in the publics' interest. Our clinic project has investigated and implemented algorithms for determining image locations of facial landmarks such as the eyes, nose and the corners of the mouth. These landmarks, in turn, contribute to applications including pose-identification, pose-correction, and facial recognition.

Quantitative Measurement of Consumer Electronics Recycling Processes

Client
eRecyclingCorps

Faculty Advisor
Professor Ben Wiedermann

Student Team
Sarah Ferraro, Kevin Riley, Rahul Swaminathan, Carl Walsh
eRecyclingCorps provides a service to collect used consumer electronics for recycling or reuse. Other companies run their electronics trade-in programs through eRecyclingCorps, but are not currently receiving detailed feedback on the total environmental savings of the program. Our goal is to report this information to eRecyclingCorps customers by collecting relevant data from the trade ins and synthesizing it into interactive report pages.. These pages can be tailored to a specific user based on their role with their company.